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Thread: When do I start worrying?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by eJoanna View Post
    $2850 (we are in the US). The scan didn't show anything, not even chiari malformation.
    Personally I would want a 2nd neurologist to confirm this if she was mine...she is a very lucky 12 month old rescue to be totally clear of CM/SM.

    Wonder why a food allergy wasn't investigated first?

    Alison.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by eJoanna View Post
    One idea why the dog is rubbing the face and scratching that nobody mentioned here - it may be the food. Most of the kibble contain so much fillers that dogs can't digest. In fact they don't have much enzymes to digest most of the carbs and the best kibble contains 50% of carbs on the dry basis (the best such as Orijen, the regular one will be more like 70-80%). Then also the "protein" the kibble may contain not only animal protein but also protein from veggies which is not really appropriate for the kidneys to break down. Not mention that animal protein in the kibble may be some parts such hooves and peaks. That all is very hard for the dog system to deal with it. Some do okay but some don't at all. First symptoms are tear stains, red stains around the mouth and red staining on the paws. The dog starts itching - they may lick their paws, bite the paws and tail and they try to rub their faces because they itch. Unfortunately most vets do not connect bad foods with the health but if you do research, there is a lot of scientific materials on it. Just recently one of the friends had that issue with her 12 months old rescue. She did go to the neurologist and did MRI under the anesthesia and paid $2850 (we are in the US). The scan didn't show anything, not even chiari malformation. Turned it out it was a food sensitivity.
    Hi, thank you so much for the reply. It is definitely something I will look into. She often has wet eyes, but because of her colouring it's hard to see whether it's bloodstained. I will wipe it gently to see in future.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cavielove View Post
    Personally I would want a 2nd neurologist to confirm this if she was mine...she is a very lucky 12 month old rescue to be totally clear of CM/SM.

    Wonder why a food allergy wasn't investigated first?

    Alison.
    The reason it wasn't something that wasn't investigated (if you are referring to me and my dog) is that it doesn't appear to be linked to meal time...it only really happens regularly first thing in the morning and then sometimes now and again during the day. But I suppose it wouldn't need to happen after a meal to be food linked.

  3. #23
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    My Anna is 14 this September and she is a face rubber. Always has been. She does suffer from ear issues tho. Generally if it is the ears, it tends to smell, particularly if its ear mites and there will be discharge gunk on the outer edge of the ear opening. I use Advocate which nails Ear mites and worms. I alternate monthly with Advocate/Frontline to cover all the bases. I clean all the crews ears with EPI Otic.

    I worry more than you do - trust me....

  4. #24
    MMM Guest

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    Just checking re diet, I feed all four of my girls Orijen as it says it's carb free????

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by MMM View Post
    Just checking re diet, I feed all four of my girls Orijen as it says it's carb free????
    Orijen, or any other kibble for that matter, is not carb free (and it doesn't say on their packaging. Orijen is the best kibble known to me on the market (quality of meats, high % of meats, low glacemic index veggies). However even that best quality kibble is a highly processed food full of carbs. To make kibble, you need fillers such (in Orijen it is peas) and meat. Orijen has 80% of meat on the wet basic, before hours of baking in 400 degrees. After baking it has less than 50%. Other brands have much less so after baking there is hardly any meat.

    RE: why the dog was not tested for allergies - not sure why. However the dog may be sensitive to the food and not have allergies. It's the process of making the kibble and inappropriate ingredients (for dogs) that make the food not easy to be broken down and assimilated by body. As a result, the toxins go through the skin and the skin itches, through the eyes and there are awful tear stains. Of course it also affects the kidneys and this is why there are so many dogs with kidneys issues nowadays (it's not high protein as some believe but low quality non animal protein and other fillers that kill the kidneys)
    Greetings from Joanna & Maxi, Zoe & Arabella (Kissabella)

  6. #26
    MMM Guest

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    eJoanna is correct in her rather curt reply, Orijen is grain free so has no carbs from grain, but does have a very low percentage of carbs from veg and fruit. Orijen however strongly dispute the rest of her statement and would refer anyone looking for information on their product to their website.

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    I didn't think eJoanna's reply was curt, I found it full of useful info. Are you connected with Orijen in any way, MM?
    Sheena Stevens

  8. #28
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    I personally think that Orijen is the best kibble out there - but it has all shortcomings of the kibble - so it has a lot of carbs and it is a highly processed food (as all dried foods are)

    As far as "being curd" - I'm not a native speaker -so I'm just to the point. I actually had to check in the dictionary what that word means after reading it here
    Greetings from Joanna & Maxi, Zoe & Arabella (Kissabella)

  9. #29

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    Sorry to hijack your thread Keniki.

    We thought we were doing right by our dog and fed Orijen to her.We have recently had to start feeding her a low protein food due liver problems and realised that Orijen is 38% protein !! Even our vet was surprised how high it is.
    Stephanie.....and two little ladies.

  10. #30
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    Stephanie - I have to completely disagree with you - you are supposed to feed your dog (or cat) animal based protein and fat. Their bodies are created to digest it and they hardly can digest any carbs (veggies - which I call fillers in the kibble). Note that are the food can be either protein, or fat or carbs. If you decrease the first 2, you feed carbs. Taking into account that they can't digest the carbs - you make a big harm to them feeding it.

    If they were born in wild, they would be eating entire animals which would be protein and fat (very little carbs from the content of the stomach of the pray - but it would be minimum). Their stomach is acidic - which is necessary to digest the meat, their mouth are fully created to bite of pieces of meat and bone.

    Unfortunately there is a big myth and misinformation on the protein level and unfortunately vets do not know much about it. It originated in the dog food industry - the dog food manufacturers were artificially increasing the protein level by using melatonin and other substances. They are not allowed to do it now after millions of dogs died but they still use vegetable protein to do it and that's what kills the dogs or cats kidneys

    For proper kidneys function, they need high quality animal protein and fat - if they don't get it in the food, they try to get energy from what's in the food which is plant based protein and carbs and that's harmful long term to their kidneys. Also the kidneys and bladder stones are crated if they are fed carbs - carbs change that acidic environment of the digestion system to alkaline and that's perfect environment to grow the stones.

    I wish vets knew it. Unfortunately they are educated by the big companies such as Hill's (science and prescription diet), Royal Canine, Ims and others manufacturers of prescription foods who have millions of dollars to donate to vets schools, funds the courses and army of reps who train the vets how to sell corn based food as something valuable.

    If my dog had kidneys issues, he would be on the best raw diet I could afford that would consist only with protein and fat. Non-hormones, non- antibiotic, grass fed meat in following proportions: 60 % muscle meat, 30% organs, 10% bone and with fat to protein ratio being 1.4 to 1.

    There is a tone of scientific research on it - google it and see (google - dog kidney and raw diet)
    Greetings from Joanna & Maxi, Zoe & Arabella (Kissabella)

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