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Thread: Denmark Kennel Club proves a rigorous mandatory MVD breeding protocol works!

  1. #11

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    In the US, it is getting much more common for cardiologists to lug portable ultrasound equipment to heart clinics at dog shows and "stand-alone" clinics. Usually, the cardiologist does not recommend an echo unless he hears a murmur first. But in many cases, the echo exams must be scheduled in advance of the shows. At shows, the echo prices range from $150.00 to $250.00. At the higher prices, the cardiologist usually includes the auscultation at no extra price.
    Rod Russell

  2. #12

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    With the $ and € near parity at the moment ($1 = 0.93€) that does seem really rather expensive! Is that just in your State, or is it a general price over the whole USA??

    The cardiologists here do auscultation anyway, before the ultrasound, as so often dogs at stade 1 and 2 have no audible murmur. There is no extra charge for auscultation.

    As I said before, at the clinic the price is 130€ but at the club shows or sťances arranged for numerous dogs to be scanned it is 65€ per dog: we too have to book our places in advance, as most of the cardiologists will only do it for at least 40 dogs. Having said that, the cardiologists on the club scheme are very keen to help the breed and were all material in the creation of the heart scheme.

    The vet I used ages ago charged half the price of the cardiologist, but then his machine was less powerful.

    Jane

  3. #13

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    Jane, I use a cardiologist who comes to our Vet Practice as and when required. He has a portable Echo, which, he tells me, exactly as your Vet said, cost the same as a new car.
    He charged me, a couple of years back, £185.00, but that was definitely a favour to me.
    A full Cardio workout for the Pet Clientele is around £500.00. So we are looking at quite a difference in price from Europe.
    Our Club sponsors a yearly Cardio auscultation, which is free to members, and £5 to non members. Anne French does the day for £250, so all the Club need do is recoup some of the cost via the non members.
    Hard to find a reason for such a huge difference in price, except that our BVA might have something to do with it. I do know for a fact, that the forms the Cardiologist fills in have to be purchased by them from the BVA. Quite a money-spinner!
    Elspeth

  4. #14

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    I am quite shocked. There are prices that are controlled here, but most are down to the individual vet. Last year when Tchi had a consultation with an oncologist at a veterinary hospital the total bill was 188€, £145, for the consultation, removal and analysis of a tumour, a blood test for 19 different levels, and two "dosage biochimie" whatever that means. The basic consultation fee was more than double that of my vet, and his total cost for her anaesthetic and removal of the original tumour was 180€! On the other hand, the analysis of that tumour, which was by an external laboratory, was over 130€.

    Bijou's eye consultation at a different veterinary hospital was even more expensive: the basic consultation fee was 90€ and the graft alone cost 950€. Hospitalisation overnight was 80€, the anaesthetic etc was 92€ and the pretests (blood and urine) were 41.50€ However, there were two vets who performed the surgery, something I hadn't appreciated until one of the (free) controls afterwards when they both saw Bijou, and then it was apparent that they'd worked together.

    I'll assume the difference is explained in the price of running a dedicated hospital and a clinic; at the hospital there is always a veterinary nurse on the premises, day and night.

    I don't know how prices compare in other European countries.

    And I thought I came to France for the wine

    Jane

  5. #15

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    These US prices are at heart clinics throughout the USA. They are significantly lower than at appointments at the cardiologists' offices.
    Rod Russell

  6. #16

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    Wow. I had no idea that veterinary fees in the USA were so expensive!

    I think drugs may be cheaper. Horse wormers were cheaper from the USA than they are here: my brother used to bring them back when he did his annual trip to Texas. His friends, who have a ranch, bought them for their own horses, so ordered extra for us.

    Jane

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Janelise View Post
    Wow. I had no idea that veterinary fees in the USA were so expensive!
    I think that is one of the reasons that in the USA, the MVD breeding protocol focuses on auscultation. It is both cheaper and easier to obtain. Of course, the protocol calls for the auscultating to be performed by cardiologists. But, we have many heart exam clinics at shows over here, with cardiologists performing stethoscopic exams for $35.00 to $45.00 per dog.

    Some cardiologists want to ultrasound any dog they find with a murmur. But the ACVIM (American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine -- which board certifies cardiologists) consensus has been to not require echocardiograms unless and until auscultations combined with x-rays fail to explain symptoms.
    Rod Russell

  8. #18

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    Such a shame; with auscultation it's just what the cardiologist hears and that can't be shared with anyone.

    Experienced cardiologists can perform an ultrasound and get good "photos" of the valve in a few minutes, and so produce results that can be seen by anyone.

    I've never had a print of the colour doppler, so don't know if the cardiologist has a machine that can print colour.

    I once had Hazel at the clinic for her heart test and mentioned that she had been mated three weeks previously. Dr le B then searched and found one embryo at, he suggested, 18 days. Sure enough, she had just one puppy - but he didn't charge me more for the extra scan.

    Quite a few people routinely scan pregnant bitches, but I generally prefer not to and don't know the cost.

    Jane

    PS

  9. #19

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    Here is a link to a photo from a color Doppler. It shows red blood at the top, regurgitating from the mitral valve of a cavalier.
    http://cavalierhealth.org/images/hag...urgitation.png
    Rod Russell

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