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Thread: Tri boy 9rs old. Gables Farm, Plymouth.

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    West Midlands
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    2,066
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    Quote Originally Posted by Max and Toby Mom View Post
    I don't understand about him being unfriendly either. My Max is a timid little thing. He's not keen on children he doesn't know or bouncy dogs for that matter, but if I introduce him to them gradually he gets on fine. He loves both my 2 and 3 year old grandsons now and even gets along with my daughters 9 month old labradore puppy! It took him a little while but all it took is patience and understanding. Wish I lived in the catchment area.
    I've had similar experience. All my grandkids are now adults, so when Pets As Therapy asked me to take my PAT dog Holly P to Birmingham Children's Hospital to see one transplant child, I thought it would be okay, having no idea how she would react to meeting other children on busy wards. We saw the child, which was on the bed work, then looked for the way out of the ward to go home. Me being me, I went entirely the wrong way, walking right through the busiest part of a large ward and meeting quite a few children and their parents head on. I need not have worried, Holly P is a Cavalier through and through. Like your experience Sheila, Holly was a little bit reserved and out of her comfort zone, but the visit was such a resounding success that we were quickly asked back to 'special' a terminally ill little boy on a one to one basis for an initial six weeks. As we walked along the corridors to and from the ward, nurses kept appearing and asking for Holly to come into their ward to meet the children. We were there for over 3 hours and it wasn't long before Holly P developed her own techniques for dealing with the very sick, the kids getting better and those in for minor procedures and able to run around and often surround her.

    There's a simple answer - she's a Cavalier - bred to interact well with both adults and especially children, whom she plays with, comforts and adores without reticence. She's even been mobbed by a group of kids in a general ward and used eye contact to line them up in a semi circle around her, all nice and settled down, while she has eye contact with each in turn before they go happily on their way.

    So what has happened to the dog at Gables? Whatever it might be, there is such a thing as time, patience and understanding to bring about a change. Keeping such a dog in kennels will only reinforce the cycle of fears and inhibitions. Rehoming the Cavalier with a loving and understanding family is much more likely to bring about a 'cure'.
    Last edited by ByFloSin; 02-01-2016 at 09:56 PM.
    Warmest wishes
    Flo

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Witney, Oxfordshire
    Posts
    17

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    Quote Originally Posted by ByFloSin View Post
    I've had similar experience. All my grandkids are now adults, so when Pets As Therapy asked me to take my PAT dog Holly P to Birmingham Children's Hospital to see one transplant child, I thought it would be okay, having no idea how she would react to meeting other children on busy wards. We saw the child, which was on the bed work, then looked for the way out of the ward to go home. Me being me, I went entirely the wrong way, walking right through the busiest part of a large ward and meeting quite a few children and their parents head on. I need not have worried, Holly P is a Cavalier through and through. Like your experience Sheila, Holly was a little bit reserved and out of her comfort zone, but the visit was such a resounding success that we were quickly asked back to 'special' a terminally ill little boy on a one to one basis for an initial six weeks. As we walked along the corridors to and from the ward, nurses kept appearing and asking for Holly to come into their ward to meet the children. We were there for over 3 hours and it wasn't long before Holly P developed her own techniques for dealing with the very sick, the kids getting better and those in for minor procedures and able to run around and often surround her.

    There's a simple answer - she's a Cavalier - bred to interact well with both adults and especially children, whom she plays with, comforts and adores without reticence. She's even been mobbed by a group of kids in a general ward and used eye contact to line them up in a semi circle around her, all nice and settled down, while she has eye contact with each in turn before they go happily on their way.

    So what has happened to the dog at Gables? Whatever it might be, there is such a thing as time, patience and understanding to bring about a change. Keeping such a dog in kennels will only reinforce the cycle of fears and inhibitions. Rehoming the Cavalier with a loving and understanding family is much more likely to bring about a 'cure'.
    Quote from Gables on Facebook

    Brady is currently residing with the Deputy Manger Ruth who lives on site. He has health and behaviour problems so needs a special understanding pet free home with no children. If you can offer him this please contact Gables Farm Dogs and Cats home on 01752 331602. Thank you.

    Both my wife, who like me is a cavalier lover, and the local cavalier rescue, have tried to see him. We know we can't have him for ourselves as we already have 3 dogs but all offers of help are being rebuffed by Gables. I understand he was taken in by the RSPCA, who use Gables as they don't have their own facilities locally and I know that there is a particular area he can't be rehomed back to.

    There must be someone not too far away, who can offer him a loving home to get him out of his current situation. I believe Cavalier Rescue can help with costs of any medical issues - we can put you in touch with someone who knows more details.

    If you know anyone who might be able to help get this poor chap into a better place, please get in touch, either with Gables or by messaging us.

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