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Thread: Cartrophen for arthritis.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Wiltshire. U.K
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    934

    Default Cartrophen for arthritis.

    Has anyone here used Cartrophen for arthritis in their dogs?

    My 11 yr old Sheltie suffering badly with arthritis had her first of four (one weekly for a month) injections of this yesterday. I cant tell you how bad it has been today. Poop like yellow water and vomit just the same throughout most of the day so a negative affect really. I can count on the one hand how many times she has been sick over the eleven yrs so I know it is a reaction to this.
    I have given her Glucosamine joint supplement since a puppy to try and prevent this in old age so it makes me wonder was it all worth it.

    I would be interested to hear of any results that anyone has had on this with their dog before I subject her to another round next wk.

    Alison.

  2. #2

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    Never used it Alison, but it does seem from below that loose stools are a common side effect, and in humans.

    Cartrophen Vet

    Rimadyl is also known as 'Carprofen.' There is another drug, developed in Australia before Rimadyl, called 'Cartrophen.' Although the generic names are similar, the drugs are radically different. Cartrophen Vet is not an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug), as Rimadyl is. Unlike Rimadyl, which intends only to relieve the symptoms of arthritis, Cartrophen is purportedly a "disease modifying anti-osteoarthritic drug" that promotes the regrowth of cartilage and the generation of synovial fluid. Cartrophen Vet is like Adequan and Cosequin in this respect.

    According to a note from the manufacturer (Biopharm of Australia; Arthropharm of Canada is the North American/Canadian distributor): "Cartrophen Vet is not available in the USA at this time. However, a USA file is almost complete for the product and we are doing research in Universities in the USA. At this time, the product is available in Canada and we understand that it can only be imported into the USA by individual veterinarians. Arthropharm Pharmaceuticals Inc., can be contacted at 613.738.8607." Cartrophen may be administered by injection and is also available in capsule form. It is sold by prescription only in Australia, England, and Canada. Arthropharm has a website at: http://www.arthritis.au.com and an e-mail address at info@arthritis.au.com.

    The manufacturer labels the drug with the recommended dosage of one shot per week for the first 4 weeks and one shot every 4 weeks thereafter for the life of the animal. If the drug is used following surgery, it can be discontinued once healing is complete. Studies done on Cartrophen in England were based on one shot every 6 months rather than every 4 weeks; thus, the results may not truly reflect the efficacy of the drug when administered as recommended by the manufacturer. Nonetheless, the performance of the drug seems to have been reliable and good enough to warrant tests of its effectiveness on humans. These tests are currently being conducted in Australia.

    Excerpts from anecdotal reports that attest to the efficacy of Cartrophen Vet follow:

    May 1999, from John Lynch of Olympia, WA: "I have a soon-to-be (July 31, 1999) twelve-year-old German Shepherd bitch with severe arthritis in both of her elbows. The condition is secondary to ununited anchoneal processes (UAP) in each elbow, a condition that afflicts some Shepherds. I have tried every possible medication to ease the female's discomfort. Rimadyl nearly killed her; after six days she had extremely anomalous liver readings, and, to Pfizer's credit, their veterinarian concurred with mine and advised ceasing the medication immediately. She has had glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate as a supplement for years. She also takes 'Winston's Joint Formula,' which seems to afford some mild help. She is also dosed with two Tylenol extended-relief-for-arthritis tablets (650 mg. each) twice-a-day. She has had a full series of Adequan injections as well, including follow-ups, to no appreciable benefit. I've also tried other homeopathic herb/nutracuetical remedies as well (e.g., MSM, Evening Primrose Oil, Vitamin C, etc.)

    "I first heard of Cartrophen Vet on the Senior Dogs Project website. I also found it referenced in a veterinary text on small-animal arthritis. I contacted Arthopharm, the company which manufactures Cartrophen Vet in Australia. Since I live 60 miles south of Seattle, I also asked for names of veterinarians in British Columbia. I contacted the closest clinic and made arrangements to pick up the medication for the initial course of treatments --- once a week for four weeks and once every month thereafter for four months. The total cost was just under $100 U.S.

    "That following Monday, my dog had her first shot. She has now had all four weekly shots and is due for her first monthly supplement on May 24th. The effect has been dramatic. I have finally found something for her which has had a truly and markedly clearly beneficial effect.

    From Richard Owocki (owocki@sympatico.net) in Canada: "I have an 8-year-old Border Collie named Megabyte. Just about a year ago his competition obedience marks went from 198's to 180's. He was always sitting off to one side. X-rays showed bad hips (HD) with the onset of arthritis. He started on .7cc of Cartrophen Vet once a week for six weeks and once a month ever since. I have seen no side effects. All I know is I have a pain-free Border Collie who enjoys Frisbee, agility, and racing around the fields with my other dogs. Cartrophen Vet has given Megabyte a second chance at what he loves to do. I feel all dogs everywhere should have that same chance."

    Side effects of Cartrophen Vet known to occur in the first 48 hours after administration and then to disappear are: (1) lethargy; (2) a rise in body temperature. There have also been undocumented reports that, in the human trials currently being conducted, severe diarrhea has occurred along with small GI bleeds in almost 100% of patients. Stroke has been mentioned but not substantiated as a potential major complication, along with sudden death syndrome in dogs. Since the clinical trials are not yet complete, definitive conclusions cannot be drawn about these side effects. It has been determined, however, that Cartrophen Vet is contraindicated for dogs with cancer. Cartrophen increases the blood flow to joints and, at the same time, to tumors; therefore a dog who has been diagnosed with cancer should not take Cartrophen.
    Sheena Stevens

  3. #3

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    Sheena, thank you for posting that! NOW I understand the other reason why the vet did not think it a good idea to give Tchi Cartrophen, or any other medication.

    Jane

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wiltshire. U.K
    Posts
    934

    Default

    Well she certainly will not be getting any more treatments.
    Three days of severe sickness and diarrhoea have done my old girl no good at all and this will set her back a good while.
    The last three days have been just miserable for her but it all seems to be finally stopping now.

    Alison.

  5. #5

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    Poor little thing - I hope she can get back to eating normally as soon as possible.

    Jane

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