Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Green Tomatoes

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    West Midlands
    Posts
    2,052
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Green Tomatoes

    My 2 plants have cropped very late this year. I have some good sized fruits on the plants, but they are not ripening, nor are they likely too while left on the plants.

    1. Does anyone have any ideas that work for ripening these fruits indoors?

    2. Does anyone have any recipes not involving deep frying or pickling to use them while green.

    3. Has anyone tried slicing and shallow frying or baking green fruits in the oven with perhaps streaky bacon and maybe onion rings.

    4. Is it likely they would make tasty kebabs with the above ingredients, cooked in either a Halogen Oven or perhaps the George Foreman Grill?
    Warmest wishes
    Flo

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Benoni, 32km east of Johannesburg, Tvl, South Africa
    Posts
    99

    Default

    My late mum used to put them on a sunny windowsill and turn them daily. I don't remember how long it took. It might be worth trying what we do here with unripe avocados which is to put them into a paper bag with a ripe banana. Apparently the banana gives off some substance which assists ripening.

    http://allrecipes.com/recipes/15156/...reen-tomatoes/ has a number of recipes for breads, cakes, pies, jams and soups.

    and there are more at http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/i...tomato-recipes

  3. #3

    Default

    Put the green tomatos on clean white absorbant paper where they'll get sun and put one ripe one with them: they will ripen! As Dorothy says, a banana woud do the trick too.

    Fruits that continue to ripen after being picked give off ethylene gas and this, somehow, encourages others: I think some give off more gas than others. These fruits inculde Apples, Apricots, Avocados (which only start to ripen after being picked), Bananas, Cantaloupe Melons, Guavas, Honeydew melons, Kiwis, Mangoes, Nectarines, Papayas, Passion fruit, Peaches, Pears, Plums, Quinces - and Tomatoes.

    Ones that don't ripen, just rot if let too long, are all citrus fruit, Blackberries, Blueberries, Cherries, Cucumbers, Aubergines, Figs, Grapes, Olives, Peppers, Pineapples, Pomegranates, Raspberries, Strawberries and Tayberries

    Mine are still ripening outside and just one plant has given more than I can eat!

    Jane
    Last edited by Janelise; 10-10-2016 at 11:39 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    On a boat, out there, operating without any decent restraint, well Notts
    Posts
    689

    Default

    Since I have the run of Marys garden, I decided to get a polytunnel off Ebay for 50 quid. The idea being that it might chivvy Mary off the sofa and into gardening. I ended up doing all the work...

    Anyhoo, mate of mine is a keen gardener and took up my offer of getting a 6x3x2 huge tunnel as well.
    12717578_10209298910491419_7789241588892481882_n.jpg

    I made up a load of raised beds out of scrap pallets and filled em with a mixture of compost from Lidl and soil that was taken off the top of the lower garden when I had it leveled by another mate and his mini digger.... That cost 3 cases of Strongbow and a bottle of Pernod.....

    There was probably about 6 tons of earth from that exercise and Richard thought it would be a good idea to use it to grow stuff in. It would need sifting tho and guess who got to do it? It about broke my back, so I whipped up a machine from bits I found in the shed.

    https://youtu.be/lfT8CQl6uQs

    We have had 150 various tomato plants on the go. Beef, Tigarella, Sweet Millions, Outdoor Girl, Shirley, Gardeners Delight, Sungold and plum. The plums being the worst, huge great things but not much taste. They are still going tho and are alright for cooking.
    13516705_10210458880969956_5567348185010509374_n.jpg 13529003_10210458880809952_7550062727645393986_n.jpg 13529003_10210458880809952_7550062727645393986_n.jpg 14141787_10210996568531809_2297625324151692073_n.jpg 14102586_10210996568411806_1656087444814710584_n.jpg

    We also managed to get early blight, but a bit of swift action by removing foliage stemmed its onslaught.

    This year has been utterly pants for everything, nothing grew like last year and it was only August when we started to get ripening fruit. The only thing that did well was spuds, that I grew in barrels.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    On a boat, out there, operating without any decent restraint, well Notts
    Posts
    689

  6. #6

    Default

    Impressive! I was going to say Heath Robinson but it's a really good contraption. One year Tom grew carrots in a tub and mixed soil, sand, compost and horse manure in a cement mixer! The carrots were brilliant but had to be watered virtually daily. Beats my crop hands down. Try Black Russian - they don't look that pretty but taste fantastic, even when cooked, and I'm not a fan of cooked tomato. They're easy to grow from seed, too.

    Jane

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    West Midlands
    Posts
    2,052
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default

    Definitely impressive Neil. Magnificent in fact. Well done. My little town gardens are much too 'compact' for polytunnels and the neighbours would have apoplexy if I tried to scale them down to fit! The mid boggles, big grin at the thought of it.

    I did try a tomato house (mini greenhouse) a couple of years ago, with good results. I had forgotten about it. Perhaps I should try again next year.

    Meanwhile, thanks for the replies folks. I have put the recipes into my folder and will try them out if I need to. Am trying someone's suggestion of putting some of the 'yellow tinged' fruits into a cardboard box with a ripe banana. Too early to tell if it will work, but I live in hopes.

    Jane: Cooked tomatoes are thought to be good at preventing cancer. One of the nurses at the urology clinic told me after the last bout of it and I've since been clear for over 4 years and discharged from clinic. They are supposed to negate free radicals.
    Warmest wishes
    Flo

  8. #8

    Default

    Thanks Flo - I didn't know that! I can eat tomato purée and fresh cooked tomatoes in things like ratatouille or pasta dishes, i.e. if they’ve got “help”, but just cannot eat tinned tomato. Tom used to cook a “full English” which was quite a work of art; he’d sprinkle brown sugar on half tomatoes which went under the grill first, then grated nutmeg on the bacon before it joined them. There would also be mushrooms cooked in very hot unsalted butter for just a short while so they’d have crisp edges but be cooked through. Sometimes he’d add slices of garlic right at the end, so it didn’t burn. The eggs, on the other hand, were cooked slowly in fairly deep rape seed oil and he’d spoon hot oil over the top to cook the yolks. Never did he allow the edges to go crispy or crinkly. The toast would be bread with seeds and grains in it, sunflower, wheat, etc., only just toasted so pale golden, and he had the timing absolutely perfect. It always irritated him slightly that I would only eat one half tomato: the caramelised top was OK. The egg cooking method I still do, although I don’t eat eggs much now I no longer have any hens.

    The day after Tom’s funeral I cooked eggs for breakfast for almost his whole family: his three children and their wives and husband and three of the four grandchildren present: Scott had a bit of hangover from the wake and asked for fruit juice and plain toast which he took into the garden to eat, even though it was March and not very warm. My neighbour Fréderic had given me about 30 fresh eggs (refusing payment, even though he usually sold them) and we had a production line going where one daughter in law cut the bread, his daughter toasted it and the other daughter in law spread it with butter and held the plate while I put the eggs on it. We didn’t cook anything else; if anyone was still hungry there was toast and marmalade. His younger son said “I’m so glad you cook eggs like Dad did.” And got a bit of a sharp look from his wife……

    Jane
    Last edited by Janelise; 10-16-2016 at 08:52 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    On a boat, out there, operating without any decent restraint, well Notts
    Posts
    689

    Default

    I've learnt a helluva lot this year, mostly about tomatoes...
    Firstly its about the growing medium. A growbag is great, but a few minor tweeks will give tons better results. Add some Wilko Poultry Manure and mix in about 2 weeks before potting on, you'll need to keep the bags covered until this time as Cavaliers regard the pellets as tasty snacks...
    When the plants are putting on leaf, feed them nitrate based fertiliser. When the flowers start to show add phosphorus feed to the mix. When the fruit starts to set, stop the nitrate and phosphorus and just use potassium feed such as Tomorite.

    We'll have a competition next year!

  10. #10

    Default

    I like the idea of a competition: will we all grow the same varieties or choose our own??? Mine grow outside as it's quite a good climate for them Who will do the tasting?????

    Jane

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •