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Thread: Green Tomatoes

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    On a boat, out there, operating without any decent restraint, well Notts
    Posts
    689

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    Choose our own, as some might be better in different areas. As for tasting, we shall just have to be honest....
    The best tasting this year were without a doubt the Sweet Millions, just bursting with sweetness. I can honestly say they were the best toms I have ever tasted, followed by Sungold.
    The most resistant to pests are Shirley, Outdoor Girl and Gardners delight and they turned out to be pretty good too.
    The Tigarellas cropped the most and were particularly scrummy.
    The Beef took an an age to get going and didn't crop very well, but they tasted far better than any tom you get in a supermarket. The Plums weren't very good, most got too big before they ripened, but the smaller ones tasted better.
    As a bit of an aside, I have just sown some Cornish potatoes and I'm going to move them into the tunnel over the winter. We shall see what we get....

  2. #12

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    I don't know sweet millions, only sweet 100, so logically the millions have to be better. Cornish potatoes sound interesting, but I’d never thought of planting them over winter. My father used to grow all sorts of varieties of vegetables and he once brought us a basket of four varieties of potatoes to try and comment on: pink fir apple, ratte, purple majesty and another I can't remember - it may have been Charlotte. As I remember we couldn't make up our minds as they were all so different, and he continued to grow them all as well as his more traditional King Edwards. I buy ratte from time to time: they are extraordinarily expensive and only available at certain times of the year, but so delicious. I was in the UK this time last year and brought home a sack of Cara spuds: that’s a variety I’ve never seen on sale down here and I like them as they’re pretty versatile and taste good. I kept them in their sack in a black dustbin with sand at the bottom, just outside the back door, just hoping we didn't get too bad a freeze. We didn't: there could be ice on the bin, but they weren’t affected.I don't know sweet millions, only sweet 100, so logically the millions have to be better. Cornish potatoes sound interesting, but I’d never thought of planting them over winter. My father used to grow all sorts of varieties of vegetables and he once brought us a basket of four varieties of potatoes to try and comment on: pink fir apple, ratte, purple majesty and another I can't remember - it may have been Charlotte. As I remember we couldn't make up our minds as they were all so different, and he continued to grow them all as well as his more traditional King Edwards. I buy ratte from time to time: they are extraordinarily expensive and only available at certain times of the year, but so delicious. I was in the UK this time last year and brought home a sack of Cara spuds: that’s a variety I’ve never seen on sale down here and I like them as they’re pretty versatile and taste good. I kept them in their sack in a black dustbin with sand at the bottom, just outside the back door, just hoping we didn't get too bad a freeze. We didn't: there could be ice on the bin, but they weren’t affected.I don't know sweet millions, only sweet 100, so logically the millions have to be better. Cornish potatoes sound interesting, but I’d never thought of planting them over winter. My father used to grow all sorts of varieties of vegetables and he once brought us a basket of four varieties of potatoes to try and comment on: pink fir apple, ratte, purple majesty and another I can't remember - it may have been Charlotte. As I remember we couldn't make up our minds as they were all so different, and he continued to grow them all as well as his more traditional King Edwards. I buy ratte from time to time: they are extraordinarily expensive and only available at certain times of the year, but so delicious. I was in the UK this time last year and brought home a sack of Cara spuds: that’s a variety I’ve never seen on sale down here and I like them as they’re pretty versatile and taste good. I kept them in their sack in a black dustbin with sand at the bottom, just outside the back door, just hoping we didn't get too bad a freeze. We didn't: there could be ice on the bin, but they weren’t affected.

    Jane

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