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Thread: first round French elections

  1. #1

    Default first round French elections

    I didn’t vote as I don’t have the right to vote in any but municipal and European elections, but was rather dismayed to realise that over 1/3 of my commune had voted for LePen, but the adjoining commune voted for Macron. In the whole department the majority of votes swore for Jean-Luc Mélenchon. A friend, also foreign but not British, and who lives a long distance from me posted this on Facebook: “Well, I take note of the outcome of the first round of the presidential election. That was not exactly what I wanted. Even if I am disappointed, one thing is clear to me, an obvious responsibility. There are times when you cannot pass by and do nothing. It is necessary to do everything possible so that the ideas of extreme Lepenists do not pass by voting for Emmanuel Macron. Please do not vote spoil your voting paper and please do not abstain in a fortnight. My opinion is that we must not allow to be elected the so-called patriot is who is above all racist, archaic, selfish, intolerant, brutal and anti-European. And I add that the economic and nationalist ideas could only lead to catastrophe.” He had been involved in Politics for quite a lot of his life, and I think It was quite brave of him to post this publicly He has had a lot of people agreeing with him.

    Jane
    Last edited by Janelise; 04-24-2017 at 09:00 AM.

  2. #2
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    I know it's isn't my election, but all the same, we have this same problem here with the rise of UKIP and the Brexit vote, where people probably voted to put an end to unrestricted EC citizen immigration as they think their jobs are being taken from them by cheaper European labour. I know that several of my friends voted that way because they've admitted it to me and also admitted that they didn't realise the economic implications of leaving Europe. Now that prices are increasing and likely to hit the ceiling before too long, they regret what they've done, but of course it's too late for turning.

    Then of course there's President Trump! Not what most Americans wanted but somehow he got voted in.

    All I can say is that I do hope that common sense coupled with experience will prevail in France.
    Warmest wishes
    Flo

  3. #3

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    Hi Flo,

    I read people say they voted for Brexit to keep Arabs and Muslims out of the UK: a clear case of misunderstanding.


    I rellay hope Le Pen doesn't get elected as she wants all foreigners to leave, which could be by order. I could apply for French citizenship, but don't really want to: I AM English. It is scary: I never thought Trump would be elected and now wonder if we're looking at WW3 on the horizon
    One of my neighbours has also "come out" vocally about not being pro Le Pen, cheers me up a bit!

    Jane

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    Quote Originally Posted by Janelise View Post
    Hi Flo,

    I read people say they voted for Brexit to keep Arabs and Muslims out of the UK: a clear case of misunderstanding.


    I rellay hope Le Pen doesn't get elected as she wants all foreigners to leave, which could be by order. I could apply for French citizenship, but don't really want to: I AM English. It is scary: I never thought Trump would be elected and now wonder if we're looking at WW3 on the horizon
    One of my neighbours has also "come out" vocally about not being pro Le Pen, cheers me up a bit!

    Jane
    It is scary... There have been a lot of people voting for changes... It appears that they no longer can tolerate the norm..
    Julie, Peter,
    Sydney & Harvey - Jake 21.02.11 - Bertie 21.11.16

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    This was in the late 1980s and I know regretably the world has changed since then, including France of course.

    I was in Paris and walking towards Republic Square to go to my hotel when I heard a lot of commotion; shouting and chanting. I had to walk towards the crowds to get to where I was going, so I asked one of the demonstrators what they were protesting about. I was told a bomb had recently been set off in a Synagogue, that France was a multicultural society and that the ordinary people were telling the instigators that they wanted the jews left in peace. 'Everyone lives together here in harmony with each other' I was told. So I stayed on with them because I thought they were doing a marvelous thing. People also told me there were immigrants of many nationalities in Paris, who were equally welcome and whom the people of Paris wished to protect from prejudice.

    Vive la differance
    Last edited by ByFloSin; 04-25-2017 at 02:10 AM.
    Warmest wishes
    Flo

  6. #6

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    Hi Flo,

    France had been "good" to foreigners, which I think was in part due to the country having been occupied during WW2 and about 75,000 French Jews being deported to concentration camps so the population knew what it was like to live in fear. It's sad but there is now quite a lot of antisemitiism in France - I'm not 100% sure why, but think it began with the rise of Jean-Marie Le Pen and the National Front which emerged at the end of the 1980's. On the other hand, after the Charlie Hebdo and Hypecacher Kosher supermarket attacks, in a large town near here the congregations of the local synagogue, churches and mosques held a multifaith service with the basic messsage "God is love", all instigated by the Imaam. There were people who didn't like that, as France is a secular country, but I think the message got through. I know two French women who married Jewish men: one told me her then future father in law told her that although he was basically a bit sad that his son was marrying someone not of their people, if she loved his son and his son loved her, that was all he could wish for and he hoped they'd make each other happy. Sadly his father, her husbnd's grandfatehr, was orthodox and refused to accept her. She learned to keep a kosher kitchen but didn't go as far as having separate meat and milk kitchens. She doesn't mix wool and linen in her clothing, but didn't convert. I notice when we have the pot luck picnics that she is careful about what she eats. The other did tale the long route to convert, but is now a widow and does not keep to the laws, nor does their daughter.

    Jane

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