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Thread: Growing stuff

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    On a boat, out there, operating without any decent restraint, well Notts
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    689

    Default Growing stuff

    Tomatos are the main attraction this year. Outdoor Girl, Beef, Gardeners Delight, Sweet Millions, Tigarella, Rainbow and Sungold.
    40 Runner bean plants: White Lady and Scarlet emperor.
    A few spuds that self seeded from last year, so that will be a "suck it and see" as to what comes out.
    And a load of strawberries that are just reddening.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Benoni, 32km east of Johannesburg, Tvl, South Africa
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    96

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    They're looking good Neil. My best are always tomatoes (which I can only eat a few because they give me gout!), sweet potatoes - but Manny loves those as well and tends to dig them up and scoff them - such a pity as this year I managed to grow the one called Borrie which has a pale orange flesh, like the Oz & NZ Kumara. I also usually get Gem Squash and Courgettes which we call Baby Marrows and I leave some to grow into full size marrows, but unlike English ones they are dark green - but taste just as good, especially when stuffed! And yes, you can be sure the dogs get the leftovers. Some years I get good pumpkins, too. Haven't had much luck with runner beans, even broad beans I just got enough for seed for next year! I do like your tunnel, but I think my dogs (I have Dals as well) would soon find a way to destroy them if the hail didn't do it first. As you're on a narrowboat, do you have a land-based allotment?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    On a boat, out there, operating without any decent restraint, well Notts
    Posts
    689

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    I have a pet pensioner that I look after and all the growing stuff is in her garden (1/3 acre).
    The trick is to get as much suitable nutrients in the ground, to kickstart young plants.
    I have used bags of compost this year as we had blight last year, so steering clear of old soil.

    Dig a hole in the compost deep enough for the transplant plant. Chuck in a handfull of chicken manure pellets and a liberal dose of Fish, Blood and bone. Give it 7-10 days for the roots to expand and watch stuff go like rockets!

  4. #4

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    Impressive: tomatos: I like all those varieties except beef, and my favourite runner beans are Painted Lady, whose flowers are red and white. Runners like their feet in shade and lots of water but also well drained soil. I have horses as neighbours so there is plenty of manure but the problem is getting lots of it to rot down for a year or four: I don't really have a suitable place. My father had a thing about chiken manure and would never use it anywhere he grew light flavoured veggies, or any root crops as he swore he could taste it: even in commercially produced manure pellets: fanciful? I don't know!

    Jane

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Murton, Co Durham
    Posts
    1,744

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    Wow.. Great stuff..

    Yes, working in a Horticulture College we muck spread with a mix of all animal manure including chicken..
    Julie, Peter,
    Sydney & Harvey - Jake 21.02.11 - Bertie 21.11.16

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Benoni, 32km east of Johannesburg, Tvl, South Africa
    Posts
    96

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    I always make my own compost and find it better than I used to with the bought stuff. I don't put the street trees' oak leaves in, nor most weeds, and neither do I include dog poops. We are in a summer rainfall area and I find that it rots down very quickly. I've never tried one, but they sell a lot of composting bins here and "guarantee" good compost within two months.

    I would not use horse manure even if I could get it, because friends lost one of their Golden Retrievers after it had eaten some which they put round their roses. Her brother was also very ill with the same thing which their vet said that they had got from the manure. Not sure what the disease was though.

    I also wonder about chicken manure, not for that, but when I grew up in Norfolk my mom kept chickens and their run was always bare of anything except the occasional bramble plant, so I figure it was just too acidic or alkaline. But muck spreading was normal on the fields - wheat and sugar beet - and great crops were grown.

    Anyway, this year I'm planting kale, my Portuguese neighbour gave me some, they grow a lot for home use (think of the classic "Cabo Verde") and it seems it needs nothing special in the ground! I'm also "into" herbs and I grow lots of comfrey and borage, which the dogs love (I do have to keep the main supply where they can't get at it, so that I can replenish where they've eaten entire plants into the ground).

    What plants do you people grow for your dogs? I find mine with tummy upsets will go and chew fig leaves, even when there's comfrey available, and even in winter they'll eat the dried ones which collect in between the multiple trunks. They'll also eat the leaves of Celtis africana, which is also known as White Stinkwood or African Elm. I'm sure these "natural" remedies are better for them than any man-made chemicals.

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