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Thread: Laura Lang's New CKCS Book

  1. #21

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    Personally, my favourite health book is called "D is for dog", written by the late Frank Manolson. He listed various breeds and various health problems, and while he touched lightly on some breed specific conditions, his advice was generally "get the dog to the vet." or, "get the dog to a vet who can refer you to a specialist". The book is touched by humour: "don't give your dog brandy, but your vet might appreciate a drop if you call him out at 2 a.m. in midwinter". "if your dog is shaking his head, wait until midday Sunday when your vet will be delighted to be called away from his Sunday lunch". The book is way out of date, but amusing reading with a lot of common sense.

    I think it sensible for any book about a breed to have a short section on common health problems, but no more than 5%. For most people, too much information is a waste of printing ink, as people just don't read it; they really are not interested. Take a straw poll of people in the street!

    All my books on the Mastiff mention HD and bloat; problems that can affect the breed, and for the latter the advice is that if you suspect it, get the dog to the vet immediately to save your dog's life. All the books about the Rhodesian Ridgeback (one is American) mention dermatoid sinus, in about two paragraphs. Only one mentions bloat, even though the breed can be slightly prone to it, as is any breed with a greedy appetite and a deep chest.

    I have books on quite a few breeds, and most have just one short chapter on health problems, which include the "general" things like what to do in case of an accident, how to wash an eye; general information that is applicable to most breeds.

    Jane
    Last edited by Janelise; 07-13-2011 at 08:26 PM. Reason: spelled vet as get...............

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janelise View Post
    Personally, my favourite health book is called "D is for dog", written by the late Frank Manolson. He listed various breeds and various health problems, and while he touched lightly on some breed specific conditions, his advice was generally "get the dog to the vet." or, "get the dog to a vet who can refer you to a specialist". The book is touched by humour: "don't give your dog brandy, but your vet might appreciate a drop if you call him out at 2 a.m. in midwinter". "if your dog is shaking his head, wait until midday Sunday when your get will be delighted to be called away from his Sunday lunch". The book is way out of date, but amusing reading with a lot of common sense.

    Jane
    This is my favourite Dog book too Jane. A really great read.......amusing and informative. I wish he had been my vet!!!

  3. #23
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    [QUOTE=RodRussell;44396]

    The author of this book is the best qualified to write about CKCS health concerns among every author who has written any book about the breed.



    What evidence do you have to be so emphatic, Rod? I think John Evans and Sheila Smith are pretty clued up on all matters regarding the Cavalier including their health and longevity. Norma


    ps To be honest, Rod, I think you have done the author no favour by being the one to promote her book! Just my opinion.
    Last edited by craigowl; 07-14-2011 at 10:15 AM.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by craigowl View Post
    ps To be honest, Rod, I think you have done the author no favour by being the one to promote her book! Just my opinion.
    I couldn't agree with you more Norma. I have just about every book ever published on the Breed, but I'll not be purchasing this book or recommending it to anyone because of these comments:


    06-28-2011 12:27 AM : Rod Russell writes:
    " This is the first book about cavaliers to be written by a breeder who has dedicated her cavalier breeding program to following the health testing and breeding protocols necessary to rid future generations of CKCSs of early-onset MVD and other genetic disorders. It's sections on MVD, PSOM, syringomyelia, and other genetic health disorders are excellent.


    For example, in no other CKCS book written by a breeder will you read anything like this statement:


    "MVD is the most common health concern of Cavaliers today. You can assume that your Cavalier will develop MVD at some point. Don't listen to breeders who say that only 50 percent develop it or that there is no MVD in their lines, as these are not true statements."

    What a down right insult to all the other excellent books dedicated to Cavaliers written by highly experienced devotees who are also breeder/exhibiter/judges with many many decades of accumulated knowledge of this breed.
    I’m always being asked by puppy owners to name a good book on the breed, and thanks to ‘the recommendation’ above I’ll never promote this new book, and neither will many others thanks to his ‘selected preview’ which slates Cavalier breeders as liars pretty much in the same way he does on his own website.

    PS..... IF Laura feels Mr Russell is misrepresenting the contents of her new book, perhaps she should either have a word in his ear, or present the true focus of her book IF it differes from that which he has made a point of highlighting.... hmmmm ...... losts of 'IF's' to consider....

    Veronica
    Last edited by Veronica Hull; 07-14-2011 at 11:33 AM. Reason: added a P.S.

  5. #25
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    [QUOTE=craigowl;44554]
    Quote Originally Posted by RodRussell View Post

    What evidence do you have to be so emphatic, Rod? I think John Evans and Sheila Smith are pretty clued up on all matters regarding the Cavalier including their health and longevity. Norma
    And there's a lovely book by Evelyn (Janie) Booth. Janie cared deeply for the breed and was very health focused. I think Rod forgets that SM was not a known issue at the time most books on our breed were written.

  6. #26
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    [QUOTE=Sandra;44561]
    Quote Originally Posted by craigowl View Post

    And there's a lovely book by Evelyn (Janie) Booth.
    I love that book Sandra.... it covers everything a Breed book should.

    >>> I think Rod forgets that SM was not a known issue at the time most books on our breed were written>>>

    I think a Breed book written by a layman who does not have a Veterinary qualification, is treading on very dangerous ground when they go into great depths on any particular health issue, or attempt to cover anything other than basic health and first aid. If you want a book on canine health, then purchase one written by a specialist Vet who has a degree in that subject.
    There are Breed books where the health section is written by a Vet or a fully qualified specialist, and that's a great idea. Most of the Cavalier books on my shelf have a good section on overall health in Cavaliers, and health care issues like cleaning ears, attending to eyes, or even the care of anal glands, and that's just as it should be when written by a layman.
    But of course none of these books slam breeders as Rod suggests this new book does… but we only have his word for that which is something Laura might feel she needs to address if he is misinterpreting the focus of her book by isolating that particular paragraph.

    Veronica

  7. #27

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    [QUOTE=craigowl;44554]
    Quote Originally Posted by RodRussell View Post

    The author of this book is the best qualified to write about CKCS health concerns among every author who has written any book about the breed.

    What evidence do you have to be so emphatic, Rod? I think John Evans and Sheila Smith are pretty clued up on all matters regarding the Cavalier including their health and longevity. Norma
    I have had both of those books since they were published. (I have just about every book on the breed ever published. Most of the currently available ones are listed at http://www.cavalierhealth.org/books.htm)

    I think John Evans' book is the best ever, but for the lack of genetic health information which he obviously did not know about at the time of its publication. His book was published in 1990; Sheila Smith's in 1995. If they "are pretty clued up on all matters regarding the Cavalier including their health", then they need to update their books. A whole lot of research and knowledge about genetic health disorders in the breed have come about since those books were published. The MVD breeding protocol was announced after both books were published, and the SM craze started in the late 1990s, with the first SM breeding protocol was issued in 2005.

    Laura Lang has been focused on genetic health of the CKCS for as long as I've known her, which has been 17 years. I don't know of any other CKCS book author with her knowledge on that subject. Several people, both breeders and professional writers, have published CKCS books since MVD, CM/SM, and PSOM, among others, have come to the fore, and none, with the exception of professional writers Caroline Coile and Loren Spiotta-DiMare have adequately covered the genetic health issues.

    Quote Originally Posted by craigowl View Post
    ps To be honest, Rod, I think you have done the author no favour by being the one to promote her book! Just my opinion.
    That depends upon the audience, Norma.
    Rod Russell

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandra View Post
    And there's a lovely book by Evelyn (Janie) Booth. Janie cared deeply for the breed and was very health focused. I think Rod forgets that SM was not a known issue at the time most books on our breed were written.
    I think you are mistaken.
    Last edited by RodRussell; 07-14-2011 at 02:35 PM.
    Rod Russell

  9. #29
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    "Laura Lang has been focused on genetic health of the CKCS for as long as I've known her, which has been 17 years. I don't know of any other CKCS book author with her knowledge on that subject. Several people, both breeders and professional writers, have published CKCS books since MVD, CM/SM, and PSOM, among others, have come to the fore, and none, with the exception of professional writers Caroline Coile and Loren Spiotta-DiMare have adequately covered the genetic health issues."

    I really don't know what you expect Rod. How can these people adequately cover genetic health issue's when the mode of inheritance for most is still unknown or unproven ?
    Any breeder who has been health testing for generations can write about their experiences but no one can "prove" that their breeding ethics actually improve the situation. We can all theorize and often test results speak volume's but without scientific evidence to support the claim it has no real credence.
    I don't know Laura Lang or what her experience is, I can only speak from my own.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by bridgette View Post
    I really don't know what you expect Rod. How can these people adequately cover genetic health issue's when the mode of inheritance for most is still unknown or unproven ?
    Any breeder who has been health testing for generations can write about their experiences but no one can "prove" that their breeding ethics actually improve the situation. We can all theorize and often test results speak volume's but without scientific evidence to support the claim it has no real credence.
    I don't know Laura Lang or what her experience is, I can only speak from my own.
    There is a lot of scientific evidence and information available about these genetic disorders, including their symptoms, diagnoses, treatment, and geneticists' testing and breeding recommendations.

    Knowing or not knowing their "mode of inheritance" should not prevent book authors from informing their readership about these facts pertaining to these disorders. Many in that audience are considering buying a cavalier, and I think that the better informed the buyers are, the better off they will be with their future puppies.

    Many others already have cavaliers but may not be aware of the symptoms of these disorders. For example, the CM/SM symptom of air scratching, or the PSOM symptoms of head-tilting and excessive yawning. You need to know what you do not know but that you need to know, and Laura Lang's book goes a long way toward educating her readers about these serious, painful genetic disorders.

    If you read her book, you will realize that she is not just writing about her personal experiences. The book is not a memoir.
    Rod Russell

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