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Thread: Puppy born with a small and dry eye

  1. #1
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    Default Puppy born with a small and dry eye

    Hi there

    Does anyone have experience of Parotid Duct Transposition in Cavaliers?

    Our gorgeous cavalier puppy has just been diagnosed at 9 weeks by an eye specialist as being born with no lacrimal gland in one eye, this eye is also about 75% of the size of the normal one. He said it's congenital and rare, he's only seen it a few times.

    The breeders vet had previously diagnosed a scratched cornea and prescribed antibacterial ointment. However by 9 weeks he was referred to a specialist as the eye was still dry, cloudy and obviously painful. He did the schirmer test which showed he has 0 tears in this eye. Needless to say we were devastated for him. We could have produced all the tears he ever needed...

    He is now on dry eye ointment about every 2 hours and the difference is fantastic, he now opens the eye a lot more. It is not so dull but the cloudiness is still there, it's only been a few days though.

    We don't know yet if the affected eye can see well or not, though the specialist commented that it looked pigmented. I've read this could reverse.

    We are faced with the difficult decision of the duct transposition and possible side affects, or to relieve him of further issues and lose this eye. The decision likely rests on if this eye has vision. We don't want him to suffer for cosmetics.

    His lower eyelid is a little droopy at the moment with the smaller eye, I guess this could be tightened later when he's full size?

    The breeder has been fantastic, no issues there. We both want what is best for the puppy. We've had him a week and have really bonded with him, he is doing so well with his training and has an amazing temperament.

    We've read good and bad stories of Parotid Duct Transposition and would be grateful to hear of any cavaliers who have had it done? I am also struggling to accept he may lose an eye.

    Thank you for any help.

  2. #2

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    Having probably owned and adored the most well known one eyed dog, I wouldn't worry too much if he needs to lose it. That may be a better option than continued pain or irritation. Read my Eddie's story at www.nidracavaliers.com
    Janine King
    Nidra Cavaliers
    New Zealand

  3. #3
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    I am so truly sorry to hear about your puppy's eye problems James, but I do compliment you and your vet on getting the problem diagnosed so quickly. My little Holly P suffered terribly with Dry Eye and Curly Coat Syndrome for several weeks and it was only by chance that she was diagnosed by the opthalmologist.

    I am taking a guess here as I haven't time to look the condition up that your opthalmologist suggests transferring one of the saliva glands from the nasal area to the eye so that it may make tears. If this is so, and I hope it helps, the advice I got both from my vet and the opthalmologist was that it is rarely successful and you may well end up worse than when you started.

    When Holly faced the prospect of having an eye removed I considered all the options very carefully and I must say all my research showed that Nidra is absolutely right in what she says about Eddie. Cavaliers are such adaptable and easy going little dogs that I am confident your pup wil cope without any problems.

    BTW, it helps to know whether you are in the UK or elsewhere, as treatments and regimes often vary between countries.
    Warmest wishes
    Flo

  4. #4
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    Thank you for the replies. We are indeed in the UK and it is an op to route a saliva gland into the eye pocket. He can do the op internally through the mouth where as most go in from the outside.

    We've read horror stories of the the saliva making the eye worse and also positive outcomes. The specialist is very much in favour of it, but of course we have to remember they do run a business at the end of the day.

  5. #5

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    Hello James,

    While I haven't had a dog with that particular problem, I have had one who had to lose an eye after an accident. She was treated for a while but the damage (it was a pressure injury that had caused internal bleeding) had clearly done too much damage. She spent a few weeks with the eyelids sewn together to protect it, but when it was obvious that the eye was not healing, it was removed. She has adapted very well.

    It is more difficult in one respect for an animal, as they don't know what's happened, but on the other hand it's not likely they'll brood about it! I do notice that when I call Hazel she doesn’t always turn her head far enough and I have to yell “This way”, then she turns it completely and sees me. She was about eight and a half years old when it happened.

    I too have lost an eye so have personal experience, and the older you are the harder it gets! A puppy will adapt quickly, and I tend to think that would be the safer option. I personally would be rather reluctant to put a pup through an operation which has only a small chance of success.

    My eye itself was OK but there were other problems which weren’t correctly diagnosed, and I had some surgery which, in the end, proved to have been unnecessary. I regret that I had it as it caused another couple of problems – nothing huge, but annoying.

    OK, that HAS coloured my judgement somewhat, but you do know the problem with your puppy!

    Jane

  6. #6
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    Here are some pics of the little man. He hasn't had his op yet but is doing great on his very frequent(!) eye gel.






  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesg View Post
    Here are some pics of the little man. He hasn't had his op yet but is doing great on his very frequent(!) eye gel.





    What a precious little man! You are lucky to have a caring breeder, and between you will make the right decision for this baby. I tend to agree with the rest of the pack, losing an eye at his age is the least traumatic way for him, especially since the surgery has such a low incidence of success.
    Sue

    Susan Shidler
    AKC Breeder of Merit
    SevenWoods Cavaliers
    Mettawa, IL USA

  8. #8
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    Winston had a parotid duct transposition just over a week ago which went well. We felt we had to try this as it looked very much like he had some kind of sight out of this eye.

    After being on an hourly eye gel for a few months the eye had become much less pigmented and it didn't seem right to remove it at this stage. There is still some scarring on the cornea.

    The results are far from perfect, keeping his eye moist involves lots of little bits of food even then it can still go dull. One side of his face is normally quite wet. But I think it will get better as we learn to manage it. It's good to know our efforts are not in vain if he keeps some vision in this eye.

    He seems happy with it!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ByFloSin View Post
    If this is so, and I hope it helps, the advice I got both from my vet and the ophthalmologist was that it is rarely successful and you may well end up worse than when you started.
    Can I ask who the ophthalmologist was, I'm guessing it might be Willows?

    The advice sheet on their website is reasonable positive of it:
    http://www.willows.uk.net/specialist...-transposition

    Winston's was done internally with very small incisions, he didn't even need a collar and was back to his normal self very quickly.

  10. #10

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    What a little trouper I hope Winston's eye continues to make progress now he has had the op. You are doing a brilliant job of looking after him and giving him all the best love and care in the world.
    (((hugs)))) to little Winston.
    Tracey x

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