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Thread: Puppy born with a small and dry eye

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesg View Post
    Can I ask who the ophthalmologist was, I'm guessing it might be Willows?

    The advice sheet on their website is reasonable positive of it:
    http://www.willows.uk.net/specialist...-transposition

    Winston's was done internally with very small incisions, he didn't even need a collar and was back to his normal self very quickly.
    Yes, your guess is right. It was The Willows and it was Christine Heinrich who gave the advice. I will always follow any advice she gives me to help young Holly. Christine isn't just a Board Certified Opthalmologist, she is actually a member of the Board, which means that she is one of those who sets the standards for others to follow.

    Before joining The Willows Christine was part of the research team studying Curly Coat/Dry Eye at The Animal Health Trust. I will always be grateful to Christine for saving Holly's right eye when my vet and the local visiting opthalmologist wanted to remove it.

    I am so glad that your Winston is doing so well. I know what it's like adjusting or devising methods of treatment as you go along. I do this on an almost continuous basis with Holly, sometimes against the advice of and to the amazement of my local vet.

    If I can help with Winston's treatment regime at any time, please do not hesitate to let me know.
    Warmest wishes
    Flo

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ByFloSin View Post
    Yes, your guess is right. It was The Willows and it was Christine Heinrich who gave the advice. I will always follow any advice she gives me to help young Holly. Christine isn't just a Board Certified Opthalmologist, she is actually a member of the Board, which means that she is one of those who sets the standards for others to follow.

    Before joining The Willows Christine was part of the research team studying Curly Coat/Dry Eye at The Animal Health Trust. I will always be grateful to Christine for saving Holly's right eye when my vet and the local visiting opthalmologist wanted to remove it.

    I am so glad that your Winston is doing so well. I know what it's like adjusting or devising methods of treatment as you go along. I do this on an almost continuous basis with Holly, sometimes against the advice of and to the amazement of my local vet.

    If I can help with Winston's treatment regime at any time, please do not hesitate to let me know.
    Thanks for the info and support. The opthalmologist that operated on Winston actually has a yorkshire terrier with the same condition (congenital dry eye + microphthalmia) that was bought in to be put down and seems to be doing fine after the procedure. I think I'm right in saying that Winston was only the third case of congenital dry eye he'd ever seen in 30 years of specialising in eyes, one being his yorkie! So Winston is rather special

    What is the treatment you are using for Holly? Is hers helped by Optimmune?
    Last edited by jamesg; 01-31-2012 at 05:56 PM.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesg View Post
    Thanks for the info and support. The opthalmologist that operated on Winston actually has a yorkshire terrier with the same condition (congenital dry eye + microphthalmia) that was bought in to be put down and seems to be doing fine after the procedure. I think I'm right in saying that Winston was only the third case of congenital dry eye he'd ever seen in 30 years of specialising in eyes, one being his yorkie! So Winston is rather special

    What is the treatment you are using for Holly? Is hers helped by Optimmune?
    I am so glad that your vet was able to treat and save his little Yorkie. Forgive my ignorance, no time to look it up, but am I right in thinking that mcirophalmia is the form of dry eye which quite a few Cavaliers now have? If so, I'm surprised that your opthalmologist hasn't seen many more than three cases of it during his 30 years, as it is becoming increasingly common in the breed. Holly is the third dog I have treated for it over the years, but none of course have been as serious.

    Holly's case is very unusual. For starters her immune system tends to reject many things, including Optimune and of course some of her own antibodies and tissues. She was given a serum spun from her blood plasma to help to heal ulceration the rejection of which almost cost her the eye. The deep corneal ulceration was thought to have been caused by her rejection of Optimune, which preceded the ulcer and which she must never be given in the future.

    Instead she has quite a collection of ointments for various aspects of her illness. Instead of Optimune she has an ointment used for dermatitis in humans, called Protopic and applied into the eye twice daily - more often if she has a flare up. Then she has Lacrilube applied morning and evening, again more often if she has a flare up. Even so, a corneal ulcer might occur at any time without warning.

    Holly also has serious skin problems as a result of her illness,m for which she also has Polyfax applied to the skin and scabs, which also doubles up as an antibacteriacide (?sp) for eye infections, applied frequently as required.

    I have to keep a good stock of Metacam to relieve the pain caused by any ulcers, Hydrocortisone Ointment in case of superficial skin lesions, antibac powder for any cuts, abrasions or lesions and a good supply of salt to make saline in the case of her catching a claw in the carpet and pulling it out. It's very naughty, but my vet has also let me have a supply of Synulux in case of sudden infection weekends or holiday times.

    Having said all that, Holly is so used to her various treatments that I only have to say 'eyes' or 'ointment' for her to come running over to me to be put on the kitchen worktop for the medications to be done. She is almost always quite the funniest, happiest and definitely the naughtiest little tricolour I have ever had, loved to the point of doteage by me and the other four Cavaliers and spoilt absolutely rotten..
    Warmest wishes
    Flo

  4. #14
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    He sees loads of dry eye, but it's normally in older dogs. Winston was born with no lacrimal gland (congenital dry eye) so produced zero tears in that eye from birth.

    Microphthalmia means this eye is smaller. So at some point it just stopped developing. Often this means they can't see out of the affected eye. It looks like Winston might be able to see something.

    The yorkie that was bought in, that the vet kept, has congenital dry eye and micropthalmia just the same as Winston.

    He says he does about 30 parotid duct transpositions a year with good success, hence we went down that route.

    We found a carbomer gel excellent for lubing winston before the procedure. Have you tried lubrithal, viscotears etc?

    Our problem was really only I could look after him and get the drops in, he's had a few days away, but it's not really fair on the dog sitter or Winston if they can't get the lube in. I really couldn't dedicate hourly drops to him for the rest of his life as much as I'd have liked to have.

    Winston sometimes came and sat between my legs all ready for his drops when he saw the tube, othertimes he'd run away like a game!

    You are doing an amazing job with Holly! She's a lucky dog. Does she produce any tears herself?

  5. #15
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    A few years ago I had a puppy with microthalmia/juvenile cataract and we had a referral to an eye specialist in Holmfirth. He didn't have an option for treatment then, but said our boy didn't know any different as he was born with it and that for him, it was probably like looking through bathroom glass.
    He had a great life and ran the hills and woods with the rest of our bunch.
    Warm wishes,
    Ruth

  6. #16
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    Winston is doing well, he's tolerating the saliva very well indeed. It's taken me a little while to adjust to him having a messy face more than often, but I try and keep it tidy with a towel.

    He is getting some deposits around his eye which are difficult to shift without rubbing too hard. So we are looking at ways to reduce them and are trying adding buttermilk to his food, which seems to have helped a little. Some people switch to a low mineral diet, but that doesn't sit well with me, maybe fine for an older dog. Will see what the ophthalmologist thinks on our next visit...!
    Last edited by jamesg; 10-09-2012 at 12:51 PM.

  7. #17

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    So glad that Winston is doing well
    Tracey x

  8. #18
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    He's grown so much!


  9. #19

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    He looks lovely!

    Jane

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