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Thread: Sleeping pattern?

  1. #11
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    She might also begin crying when she has to go potty. Take her out if she cries and praise if she goes, and then right back to bed. No petting, overly fussing, or anything except serious business...otherwise they learn to cry to be let out even when they do not have to potty.

    A 7 week old puppy will likely need to be let out nearly every 2 hours.

    Otherwise, ignore the crying. It is hard to do but that is how you train your pup to be quiet in there. My girl really was loud in her crate up until around 10 months old... she finally started quieting down and still whimpered and barked from time to time.

    Now she is 19 months old and loves her crate and doesn't make a peep in there... unless we have company over and she wants out to say hello! Even then it is just a very quiet whimper, and not excessive.

    Coco only was let out of her crate when she was quiet, except as a very young puppy for potty breaks.

    As for the biting, if teeth touch your skin, scream "OUCH!", look at your pup disgusted, and then walk away. Game ends. Your pup will learn that biting makes you not happy and the fun game ends. The most difficult part is being consistent, not mouthing your skin is something that takes a lot of repetition and consistency on your part.

    And yes, 7 weeks is very young for a puppy to leave home. I didn't get Coco until 10 weeks. Even though that is only a 3 week difference, those three weeks your puppy learns things such as bite inhibition from litter mates. This is a critical puppy development stage.
    Alisha
    &
    Coco

  2. #12
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    Alisha, at this age they don't cry when they want to go to potty. They just go. She cries because she was taken from her siblings and mom too early.
    Greetings from Joanna & Maxi, Zoe & Arabella (Kissabella)

  3. #13

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    OK Betty,

    I take your point: it is very hard to describe what I do, which is to imitate the mother. Of course I’ve had the luxury of seeing what the mother does, so am not being rough or hurting the pup, just giving him or her a surprise.

    I have actually seen more than one breeder lift a puppy of ten weeks, and older, off the ground by the scruff of the neck, both in the UK and here! It makes me shudder to remember. Neither UK breeder is still a breeder of Cavaliers.

    There has, as always, been debate on the best age for a pup to leave. Generally, it seems to be either six weeks or to wait another month, i.e. ten weeks. This is from observation; at six weeks the pup is just beginning to learn and isn’t very easily stressed; the next four weeks are a heavy learning stage, and at about eight weeks is when pups first seem to learn fear. Any change in this period is stressful, but at ten weeks they are getting settled again. This is why Guide dogs for the Blind start their puppy walking at six weeks: they want the dogs out and about and getting used to human contact and so showing less “canine” behaviour. Some people also don’t like puppies to spend much time with other dogs after the age of six weeks, as they prefer them to be imprinted more on humans than other dogs.

    One friend of mine had the rather difficult situation of having bred a litter and then having to move house when they were seven weeks old – no choice, the house came with her husband’s job and he had just eight week’s notice that he had to move! She had one of the pups reserved locally and asked six or seven different vets and animal behaviourists; she never did go for half measures; what would be best. They all said it would be better for that pup to go to the new owner at six weeks. The move would be stressful for all the pups, but to move and then send one on another long journey three weeks later really was about the worst thing she could do. I did meet the pup with the new owner sometime later and she was fine, well behaved and friendly.

    Mine usually go at ten weeks or a bit older, although when I started breeding the “norm” was eight weeks. I do a huge amount of human contact, though. The pups live in the house so learn fewer “doggy” habits than those bred in kennels, and I do let people see them, touch them, talk to them etc., and usually most of the neighbours will send the children in their families to see the puppies.

    Jane

  4. #14

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    Thankyou Jane.it is hard to describe.
    I got Saatchi at 9 weeks but only because I have had other puppies from the breeder and she knows that I have 4 other dogs. When I bring a new baby into the house I usually let it sleep in my bed until it is used to the surroundings then I pop him in the kitchen with the other dogs and I have to say that I have no sleepless nights and the baby plays with the other dogs, it usually takes about 2 weeks. I think the sound of my heart beats must sound very much like mums.

  5. #15
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    Oct 2011
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    San Mateo, California
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    My two cents on all you have said:

    sleeping: it's unfortunate she is so young, but that's what you've got. I suggest you put her into a crate (you may need to "train" her to accept it) at bedtime. Once she's in there, plan on taking her out 2 or 3 times for toileting whether she fusses or not. If she cries, wait a second until she is not making noise then leash her, take her outside, wait a couple minutes, whether she does something or not, then bring her back inside and place her back into the crate with no fuss and no playing. Ignore her when she cries in the crate, and don't comfort her verbally--that is rewarding her for fussing. Dogs interpret your speaking or focusing on them as a reward. It's hard to do! But, if you do this consistently for a few days, she will understand that when she enters the crate and it's dark, the day has ended and everyone is going to sleep now. She should settle down and sleep well. I put both my dogs into crates at night with a Kong or other chewable treat (one that is safe for them without you watching). They go in readily, enjoy their treat and go to sleep quickly. Be sure to take the collar off for safety.

    Biting: puppies learn about their worlds with their mouths, and learn bite inhibition from their litter mates and moms. She doesn't have them anymore, so you need to act like them. The fastest way is to say "Ouch!" in a loud, high pitched voice when any her mouth or of her teeth come into contact with any part of you--clothing, skin, etc. If she persists, say "ouch! again, and turn your back on her and ignore her for a minute. This is how puppies tell other puppies "You went too far--I don't want to play with you." If she continues, say "Ouch!" and leave the room for a couple minutes. Almost all dogs get the message very quickly. Puppies don't like to be ignored and they don't like to be alone. It's a gentle and effective way to teach them.

    Good luck!

  6. #16
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    Who said the dog needs to sleep in a crate? My dogs are crate trained, travel in crates, go to crates to relax but they sleep in my bed and I'm happy with that. It's personal preference. But that adults dogs.

    For such young puppies I just can't imagine to have them alone without each other company and cuddle in that age. I spend a lot of time with them playing and cuddling (multiple times a day until they are tired each time) but yet, I can see how much they need of each other company. I just breaks my heart how lonely a puppy must be deprived its siblings company. I think you have to replace what she lost, at least for next couple of weeks. I doubt that any discipline will work at that age.
    Greetings from Joanna & Maxi, Zoe & Arabella (Kissabella)

  7. #17
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    I got my Rottweiler at 6 weeks (my mistake dog... from a puppy farm) and ignoring his wailing in the crate did teach him to hush in there in a few weeks.

    I call it tough love!

    Coco was not able to sleep in bed with me at night even though I really wanted her to. She would soil our blankets over and over again.... we had to crate her at night. The Rottweiler, well, he was too big for our bed and didn't want him to get used to being in bed with us when he was small!

    My dog's crates are always in my room with me so they can see/hear/smell me and be in he "den" with me. Some people will put the crate in another room, even a garage to drown out the wailing... I don't believe in that. I stick through the crying and restless nights of sleep and we go through the training together.

    3 dogs I have crate trained this way and they all ended up loving their crates. They took their prizes poessions in there to eat/chew, go in there when they are scared, and happily go in there when asked to in anticipation of a treat!
    Last edited by Coco; 03-22-2012 at 01:49 AM.
    Alisha
    &
    Coco

  8. #18
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    Jan 2012
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    Bonny Scotland
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    My Alfie was 8 weeks when he came home and he loved his cage from the off! He went in and napped there when he arrived home and first night he toileted outside and went straight into his crate that was him til he screamed at about 7 am! I don't know if having another dog in the room helped settle but they both sleep in their separate crates in the kitchen. Alfie screams so loud if he's in there and we're going around its a horrid sound which I really hope he stops!!!!
    Fiona

    B/W Collie - Danny DOB 02/08/2010
    Ruby Cavalier - Alfie DOB 02/12/2011

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    United Kingdom
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    Default Getting there...

    Thanks guys for your useful advice, Ruby is growing so fast!
    She is now sleeping in her bed in our bedroom with her crate there for her to go toilet she is now sleeping through at night... almost! Ruby is sleeping through until about 4 in the morning and I give her a cuddle and she falls asleep and I put her back in her bed until around 7 when its time to get up.

    Her biting is making progress and she has her favourite toy to chew on which helps, I will be taking your advice also which I'm sure will make a difference

    Even Ruby was only 7 weeks old when I brought her home she seems to have settled in fine and she is such a character!

    Alice

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