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Thread: Ignorance of some people

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Ellis View Post
    Feel free to share this little beauty ...
    Such knee-jerk advice would be a mistake, IMHO. Early spaying and castrating can be a health hazard.
    Rod Russell

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Ellis View Post
    ...
    Sometimes, yes, but that is not the assured result. A crossbreed could be healthier, or not. And it could add to the genetic issues, or not.
    Rod Russell

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Janelise View Post
    ... This advert appeared today and yes, I did respond: I gave some details of the law pertaining to breeding dogs and hope it was enough to put her off.

    “My dog wants to be a Daddy

    I have a 13 month old Lhasa Apso (Male) who would love to be a Daddy. He is a purebred without papers.

    Is there anyone out there who has a female who would like to be a Mommy?

    I am in La Tour Blanche“

    I suspect the person may be American, as she used the word “Mommy”

    Jane
    I get several emails from cavailer owners who want me to hook them up with another cavalier for mating. It is tough to try to go back to square one with such people. They don't want to hear anything but the names and contact info for other hot-to-trot cavalier owners.

    My first breeding experiences were on a remote farm in my extreme youth (outhouse, no electricity, no running water, etc.), and we pretty-much let the dogs decide when and with whom to mate. I think there still is some of that mindset now among the allegedly civilized and affluent 21st century.
    Rod Russell

  4. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RodRussell View Post
    My first breeding experiences were on a remote farm in my extreme youth (outhouse, no electricity, no running water, etc.), and we pretty-much let the dogs decide when and with whom to mate. I think there still is some of that mindset now among the allegedly civilized and affluent 21st century.
    But sometimes even now dogs aren't keen on mating particular bitches, for what appears to us to be no particular reason. I remember going to the house of one stud dog I wanted to use, and we failed to get a mating. The owner suggested I take him for the weekend. I failed miserably, so took him down to Homerbrent for Molly's help. I got there about 10.30 in the morning and left about sevenish (I'd had lunch and tea, didn't feel it fair to stay for supper, VBG!), with no mating managed because the dog just didn't want to mate her. Took the dog back to his owner.

    She rang about 10 p.m. to tell me he'd just mated one of her bitches.
    Sheena Stevens

  5. #15

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    Oh Sheena, that was somewhat frustrating!

    I suppose it's reasonable for them to a bit choosy about their mates - we humans are, generally!!!

    I’ve had a bitch come here that Cedric wasn’t really interested in. Vincent was, but the owner wanted Cedric and in the end we had no success. I don’t know if she mated the bitch to another dog.

    Longer ago I had a friend stay here three days trying to get one of her bitches to mate with one of my boys - can't remember which one now; the bitch just did not want to know. Her husband's phone calls got more and more terse - they subsequently divorced...............

    Much, much longer ago there was a bitch who came to stay to be mated to Rufus and she didn’t like him at all and would not stand. We used Max; our discretion and certainly a good choice. The arrangement had been that we would whelp the litter. The owner didn’t really want any of the pups so we had pick of the litter and kept both Rascally and Raziela!

    I used to breed rabbits, and it isn't true that they are easy to breed. I had one doe that just wasn't interested in the buck I’d picked for her and refused, to the point of attacking him. Yet, later the same day she somehow managed to get the door to her pen undone, a height of a good five feet above the ground, get out and climb another at least three feet to mate with the buck SHE wanted. She had five or six babies, and was very proud of them to the point that she let me look at them the day they were born - very rare for rabbits. When I fed her she went to the nest, sat very upright next to it and looked at it and then at me. I very slowly parted the top and saw the babies snuggled up together and she just looked at me as as if to say "See?"

    Jane
    Last edited by Janelise; 07-12-2012 at 08:46 AM.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Janelise View Post
    ... I suppose it's reasonable for them to a bit choosy about their mates - we humans are, generally!!! ...
    Yeah, but ... part of the challenge of animal husbandry is to make sure the animal husbands do their husbanding jobs.
    Rod Russell

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Llandrindod Wells
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    989

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    Taking up the point that a cross-bred could be healthier.

    Health reports on both hip dysplasia and eye defects have shown that in the labradoodle they have more problems than either the labrador or the poodle, as discussed in previous threads.

    At least with a pedigree there are health/DNA tests provided for specific health conditions. The problem is getting breeders to use them !
    Bridgette Evans
    Svena CKCS

  8. #18

    Unhappy sigh

    Quote Originally Posted by RodRussell View Post
    Such knee-jerk advice would be a mistake, IMHO. Early spaying and castrating can be a health hazard.
    Apart from posting for the sake of trying to cause confrontation, where do you gleam these odd bits from

    I don't see anywhere on that sign that says spay or neuter your "puppy". And let's face it, no pet owner is going to do the operation themselves, so will be following vet guidance.

    Far too many people think that it is wrong to neuter a dog. But every owner that I have spoken to who has had the dog neutered late in life for medical reasons wishes that they had done the operation years before - due to the personality change.
    Click this line to see Alfie's Picasa web photo albums

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    Mark, and my Blen - Lexie DOB 7/07/11, and my B/T - Katie DOB 01/12/12

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Woodford Green, Essex
    Posts
    1,982

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Ellis View Post
    Apart from posting for the sake of trying to cause confrontation, where do you gleam these odd bits from

    I don't see anywhere on that sign that says spay or neuter your "puppy". And let's face it, no pet owner is going to do the operation themselves, so will be following vet guidance.

    Far too many people think that it is wrong to neuter a dog. But every owner that I have spoken to who has had the dog neutered late in life for medical reasons wishes that they had done the operation years before - due to the personality change.
    If a dog or bitch is neutered at a fairly young age it most definitely alters their coat. The hair becomes far more wooly. There is also a somewhat small risk that bitch spayed at too young an age can suffer urinary incontinence.
    Dennis

  10. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RodRussell View Post
    Yeah, but ... part of the challenge of animal husbandry is to make sure the animal husbands do their husbanding jobs.
    Well, far be it from me to suggest anything at all, but if you really think Molly Coaker wasn't capable of doing that then perhaps you should reconsider. And fairly swiftly. That dog simply did not want to mate my bitch.
    Sheena Stevens

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