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Thread: Cycle, uterus, progestorne and inflamation

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Default Cycle, uterus, progestorne and inflamation

    I have been reading recently more deeply about a bitch cycle and I have to say that if this is true, it puzzles me that nature created something to fail. What I read is that a bitch produces progesterone constantly and no matter if she is pregnant or not, the progesterone production continues and affect the uterus lining in the way, that it become inflammatory. As a result every cycle brings a bitch closer to pyo.

    Is that true? What would be the natural reason to create something to be inflamed more and more?
    Greetings from Joanna & Maxi, Zoe & Arabella (Kissabella)

  2. #2
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    I think it is because dogs are a creature meant to breed and reproduce every heat cycle, we are the ones stopping them from breeding which is what ends up being bad for them (I THINK, not an expert here). But I have definitely heard many people tell me the longer you wait to breed an in tact bitch the chances of a pyo increases. It scares me.
    Alisha
    &
    Coco

  3. #3
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    I have heard it said that "A busy womb is a healthy womb" Well, that will make a few people sit up and think.
    The trouble is it may be correct, but I for one would prefer to only whelp a litter when I need something.
    There are far too many dogs bred, be they cross breeds or the coveted pedigree show dogs. Life is precarious in more than one aspect. The thought that bitches could go into pyo because they are not bred enough is a risk we have to take, what is important is being able to read the signs should our bitches be unwell.
    Just an opinion for what it is worth.

    Tina

  4. #4

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    I must say I have to agree with Tina, as the rescues are full of dogs . In the old days we used to have 3 litters from a bitch ,we used to miss a season to give the bitch time to build up ready to do the next babes well.. and it worked . now anything goes and the poor bitch ends up just a money making breeding machine.
    Betty

  5. #5
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    It worries me because I only would like to breed in hopes to obtain a show potential better than the mother and I want to space my dogs so I don't have 10 dogs in 3 years. I want to breed my Zoe once more in hopes for a pretty Tri girl and I would prefer to wait a bit. After that I am not sure if I would like to breed again. I feel like by waiting I may harm her and I am dreading on the thought about spaying her one day. The same time I am dreading about possibility of pyo.

    I've read about Mibolerone (Cheque Drops) which stop production of progesterone (and stop the cycle) to prevent the uterus if the bitch is not bred frequently. Some people have used it without major side effects - but this is steroids and I am not sure how healthy it is long term.
    Greetings from Joanna & Maxi, Zoe & Arabella (Kissabella)

  6. #6
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    Joanna,

    What some people do and what you or I do are totally different.
    I don't agree with interfering with the bitches' natural cycle. You could probably end up with more problems than you started with.
    These people that you mention who say they have had no trouble, ask them did they manage to get their bitches into whelp easily after such a course. Did they have clean natural whelpings. Were the whelps viable and strong? Don't take just one person's response but ask many.

    At the end of the day we are all just managers of our breed. We have to do what is sound both environmentally for our dogs and what is ethically correct.
    Both these reasons can only be answerable to the conscience of the owner/ keeper at the time.
    I sound as though I am preaching, please don't read it as that, as it is not intentioned in that way. I just hate the fact that so many people use the "what other people do"
    angle.

    Tina

  7. #7

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    I agree with the fact that in nature bitches would breed every season, but then they would probably not be as well fed and looked after as our coddled pet dogs and no doubt were thinner and did not come into season as often, or would reabsorb a litter if food got short or life tough. Aslo they probably did not rear as many to adulthood.

    I agree there is far to many dogs being bred/cross bred without thought for their future, or for money. But if we, the guardians of our breed with healthy, carefully tested stock only breed when we want a new show dog ourselves the public will go and buy one from a back yard breeder/puppy farm, because they are undeniably VERY VERY popular as pets. And people do expect to ring up ask for what they want and you to be able to take it off a shelf and deliver it to them the following week, don't they!!

    I breed in order to to get that super duper show dog, but I always feel the first litter for a bitch is a sort of trial to see how she gets one with the process and to see what quality pups she throws. I can then repeat the mating a year later if they 'click' or try another stud dog.
    Philippa

  8. #8

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    Hi Joanna,

    I tend to only have three litters maximum from a bitch. Generally they are mated after their second birthday for the first litter. I have left the last litter to six years of age, and now tend to have my bitches spayed about four or five months after that final litter. If possible I just have the ovaries removed: a smaller and less invasive operation and French research over a few decades has found that bitches thus operated don't develop pyo, because it is the hormones that provoke it. It does depend on the condition of the uterus: when I had two spayed at the same time, the vet first did a laparoscopy and found one had a uterus that was marginally inflamed; he said as thick as his little finger; so he removed it.

    When they're spayed that late they don't seem to develop woolly coats! I do it because I have had two that developed a pyo at about ten years of age.

    Jane

  9. #9
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    Tina, I am not taking it as preaching - I think too it's very important to verify all information.
    Greetings from Joanna & Maxi, Zoe & Arabella (Kissabella)

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