Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Breeding after bladder stone/seasons?

  1. #1

    Default Breeding after bladder stone/seasons?

    I have a female whelping first time september 2012, she will be 4 years in June. Recently she had a bladder stone, and the 6th February it was surgical removed. She's recovering very well, I couldn't even see the scars after the surgery 12 days after. My veterinarian says I can mate her in about 6 months.
    She usually runs 8 months between her seasons, so I will guess she's expecting her season any time now.

    But is it okay to keep on breeding her even though she have had a bladder stone? She's on a special diet because of the bladderstone(and will be for some time), but how will this work out with pregnancy and needing of a richer diet with a litter?


    I'll be very thankful for any answers!

  2. #2

    Default

    Obviously, you are not mating her this season, so soon after surgery and while she is on this diet. What diet? Food for thought: In Dalmations, for example, there is a proven hereditary component. I have not heard of bladder stones in a Cavalier; is she a Cavalier or some other breed? Please check into the causes of bladder stones, and consider what type that she had. You sound as though you want her safe and would not want to endanger future generations if this extra litter is not a good idea.

    Good luck with her continued recovery.

  3. #3

    Default

    I'm sorry such a young bitch has had to under go this. There are effectively three types of stone - oxalic, struvite, and one where the struvite coats the oxalic. There is usually a staph infection involved with stone formation. My own feeling is that feeding a dry complete food will exacerbate any tendency to form stones. If I remember rightly there is at least one Yahoo group that discusses kidney infections, and bladderstones, coupled with diet, but I'm afraid I don't know it's address! perhaps someone else on here will be able to provide it. I'd be careful with her, and do as much research as possible if you plan to mate her again.
    Sheena Stevens

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Llandrindod Wells
    Posts
    989

    Default

    "But is it okay to keep on breeding her even though she have had a bladder stone? "
    I am not sure what you are asking? If you are asking would you? then you may not get the response you want. If you are asking if anyone else has personal experience of this?
    I've never yet had a dog with kidneys stones. Would I breed from a bitch who has had a GA in the previous 12 months then the answer would be no. I'd wait. Would I breed from a bitch who has had this condition then my answer would be no, there is a suspicion that it may be inherited and for me that is sufficient. she has had a previous litter (I hope you kept a puppy) I would wait and see how this condition affects her and if there are no repeats episodes I would consider breeding from her progeny - subject to them passing all the relevant health tests.
    I have a bitch here who I suspect had an inguinal hernia (could have been puppy fat) there was no sign of it when checked by the vets but I've always had my suspicions. I've never bred from her (I have her sisters), I have been accused of throwing the baby out with the bath water as IMHO she's the best b/t I've bred. But that's just me !!!
    Bridgette Evans
    Svena CKCS

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Bowers Gifford, Essex, UK.
    Posts
    1,798

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AngCain View Post
    But is it okay to keep on breeding her even though she have had a bladder stone?
    Hi,
    I had a similar situation with one of my girls so I'll share her story with you. I was about to mate Dixie for the first time at just under 4 years of age, and she was diagnosed with stones which subsequently were surgically removed. The size of her stones was spectacular, and some of the larger ones were sent to the USA for analysis, while I kept one as a reminder of what nature can produce.
    Dixie came back into season a little earlier than expected, but I decided she needed more recovery time, then when she came into season again I mated her and she had a successful delivery. She has since had her 2nd and final litter of 4 with absolutely no ill effects what so ever, and now is waiting to be spayed ready for retirement on our sofa alongside all her retired relations.
    I've no idea what other have done, but this worked for us with no 'blips' at all.

    Good Luck in whatever you decide is the right path to take with your particular girl

    Kind regards,
    Veronica.
    Last edited by Veronica Hull; 02-26-2013 at 08:19 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Bowers Gifford, Essex, UK.
    Posts
    1,798

    Default

    Just out of interest I've attached a photo of one medium sized stone removed from Dixie who is a smaller framed girl weighing in at just under 14lbs. The larger stones were unbelievable, but as this was something I had never dealt with before I researched thoroughly the why's and wherefores attached to the forming of these stones. Not one specialist suggested Dixie should not be bred from, stating that an adjustment of her diet would prevent further stones from forming.


    Dixie's bladder stone Downsized.jpg

    Veronica.

  7. #7

    Default

    Thank you for your Dixie's story. What type of stone did she have, what diet was bad for her, and what did her vets suggest to feed her? TIA.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Bowers Gifford, Essex, UK.
    Posts
    1,798

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Laylagrove View Post
    Thank you for your Dixie's story. What type of stone did she have, what diet was bad for her, and what did her vets suggest to feed her? TIA.
    If memory serves me correctly they were diagnosed as Struvite, and a raw diet was recommended. It was said the raw meat products would prevent a reoccurrence, rather than processed food that contains alkaline which affects the urinary pH. It was also recommended to feed raw vegetable matter, because feeding this natural diet prevents excess waste and the accompanying stress on the urinary tract and digestive system.
    The main foods with a focus on preventing stones or crystals forming were, chicken, beef, seafood, and some non-meat additions like eggs, cottage cheese, rice, yogurt, and beans. Remember, the vast majority of a dog's raw diet should be meat, bones and organs, whereas the non-meat ingredients should be considered extras and fed accompanying a meal of meat or fish.

    Regards,
    Veronica.

  9. #9

    Default

    Thank you for your thoughts!

    Bridgette, there's some of my problem. I kept a bitch from her litter, but she isn't developing the way I hoped for, so I will probably not run on her. And I would like another litter from my bitch, cause she have made it thru all tests (also MRI and DNA-tests) and are very healthy otherwise.

    Veronica Hull: Thank you for your story. My girl also was diagnosed Struvite, I got one of the stones with me too, and it looks exactly like the one in your picture.
    She's on a combinated raw food/veterinary specials kibble diet. She's also getting Cranberry pills for lowering her urinary pH. The only no-no thing my veterinarian talked about, was food containing a high amount of minerals. Veronica, have your bitch continued with her diet, or did you go back to "normal" after some time? Did you continue with the diet under pregnancy and breastfeeding too?

    She got into season two days ago, so I guess her next season will be in about 8 months. I think I will keep a close eye with her and make my decision closer up to her next season.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Bowers Gifford, Essex, UK.
    Posts
    1,798

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AngCain View Post
    Veronica, have your bitch continued with her diet, or did you go back to "normal" after some time? Did you continue with the diet under pregnancy and breastfeeding
    Hi
    Dixie thrives on her raw diet, as do my other Cavaliers...... Their teeth are pearly white and gums healthy thanks to their diet, and yes, she was fed this diet throughout her last pregnancy in 2010 which resulted in 4 healthy puppies.....

    Dixie is now almost 8 years old, and so far so good with no reoccurrence of this problem....( or thankfully any other issues to be concerned about )

    I have one son and two daughters of hers here, none of whom have yet been bred from, but when they 'come of age' as long as all is well they will hopefully produce my next generation.

    Kind regards,
    Veronica.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •