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Thread: UK neurologist Dr. Peter M. Smith asks why syringomyelia surgeries are failures

  1. #1

    Default UK neurologist Dr. Peter M. Smith asks why syringomyelia surgeries are failures

    UK neurologist Dr. Peter M. Smith asks why syringomyelia surgeries are failures, presumably because the syrinxes do not collapse. He also calls for new strategies aimed at preventing development of syrinxes or achieving better understanding of the pain suffered by affected dogs, but he does not offer any. http://www.cavalierhealth.org/syring...ter_Smith_asks
    Rod Russell

  2. #2

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    Rod,
    Is Dr Smith a Human neuro?
    Elspeth

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    Rod,
    Is Dr Smith a Human neuro?
    Elspeth
    No. http://vetspecialists.co.uk/clinical...ete_Smith.html
    Rod Russell

  4. #4
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    Would it be beneficial or detrimental to have human neurologists come together with Veterinary neurologists when studying this disease?
    Alisha
    &
    Coco

  5. #5
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    " It seems it is now time to divert our attention from simple morphological observations of the CKCS skull to developing a better understanding of the pain suffered by affected dogs." isn't that what many of us having been saying for years ?????

    " With greater insight into how the syrinx develops, ably documented by Driver et al. (2013), we should not only aim to understand why some dogs that undergo surgery fail to resolve their syrinx, but perhaps also try to pre-empt the development of the syrinx in the first place." and I won't disagree with this statement either prevention rather than cure.

    So pleased to see a "fresh" approach it is only when one questions established theory's that a proper understanding of a condition can be acquired.

    Coco in the UK Veterinary neurologists ARE working together with human ones as reported by the Ann Conway Trust.
    Bridgette Evans
    Svena CKCS

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by bridgette View Post
    So pleased to see a "fresh" approach it is only when one questions established theory's that a proper understanding of a condition can be acquired.
    Yes indeed Bridgette..... but .... I for one would like to know who all the negative and dismissive comments accompanying this article are being made by? .... Is it another 'expert' panicking at the new take presented to us? ... or are the responses the thoughts of the website owner?

    I would like this clarified because nobody has taken responsibility for their input sent here for us to read. Perhaps it's time for someone to put their hands up and claim exactly who said what, then we might understand 'why' it is being sent to sites like this one for comment.

    Veronica.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Coco View Post
    Would it be beneficial or detrimental to have human neurologists come together with Veterinary neurologists when studying this disease?
    They surely are and have been.
    Rod Russell

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by bridgette View Post
    " It seems it is now time to divert our attention from simple morphological observations of the CKCS skull to developing a better understanding of the pain suffered by affected dogs."...

    " With greater insight into how the syrinx develops, ably documented by Driver et al. (2013), we should not only aim to understand why some dogs that undergo surgery fail to resolve their syrinx, but perhaps also try to pre-empt the development of the syrinx in the first place." ...

    So pleased to see a "fresh" approach it is only when one questions established theory's that a proper understanding of a condition can be acquired.
    What I don't understand is the use of the words "we" and "our" in the context of someone who appears to have not participated in any CM/SM research at all. And, without any suggestions as to how to do so.
    Rod Russell

  9. #9
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    Rod - Who knows what "research" Dr Smith is involved in, I certainly don't. A similar critism was levelled at Chester Gates and the volume's of animals scanned at this centre it was ASSUMNED that these were "lost" to research. Sadly we are not privy to what is going on, we only know about published papers and even some of those are not in the "public" domain. It appears to me that although we breed the dogs and allow their participation in research projects we are bottom of the pile when it comes to divulging any findings.
    Bridgette Evans
    Svena CKCS

  10. #10
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    If this is the correct gentleman he appears more than qualified to his make his observations
    Pete Smith

    BSc BVM&S PhD DipECVN MRCVS
    RCVS & European Veterinary Specialist in Neurology

    Clinical service: Neurology


    Pete qualified from Edinburgh University and after spending three years in small animal practice in Manchester, found himself drawn back to academia. He completed a PhD and a period of post-doctoral research at Cambridge University, investigating cell transplantation as a treatment for problems such as spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis. Following this he returned to clinical veterinary work, completing a residency in neurology and neurosurgery at Cambridge University. After a stint in a private veterinary referral hospital in London, he joined the University of Liverpool, where he was Head of Veterinary Neurology for 4 years before joining Davies Veterinary Specialists. He is a European and RCVS specialist in Veterinary Neurology and his clinical and research interests include surgical treatment of spinal cord problems, inflammatory diseases of the nervous system and seizures.

    Some fresh perspective is EXACTLY what this breed needs.
    Last edited by bridgette; 10-11-2013 at 01:56 PM. Reason: text added
    Bridgette Evans
    Svena CKCS

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