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Thread: new dog with house rabbit?

  1. #1

    Default new dog with house rabbit?

    We have a house rabbit, but our dd is desperate for cavalier king Charles; has anyone ever had a (successful?) pairing up of a new dog with a house rabbit or is this just play crazy to consider? Will a new dog go after a rabbit no matter what or is there any chance of them being co-pets? Any information or stories or advice most gratefully welcomed including the good and the bad.

  2. #2

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    Not Cavaliers, but my sister kept Shelties that co-existed happily with house rabbits. At one point she had a female rabbit that gave birth then died, and she had to hand rear the baby bunnies, and one of her young Sheltie bitches took upon herself the responsibility of cleaning up the babies after they had been fed.

    I also had a friend whose Cavalier was great friends with an outdoor rabbit: I believe the Cavalier (a rescue bitch) arrived after the rabbit.

    Rosemary

  3. #3

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    This is SUCH a difficult question! I used to breed and show rabbits and when I bought my first Cavalier she was about ten to twelve weeks old. She was smaller than some of the rabbits, Alaskans, and bigger than others, Netherland Dwarfs. She was fine with them, except for one Netherland Dwarf doe who got very aggressive when she was pregnant and actually attacked Madam out on the lawn! Madam was ever after a little wary of this particular rabbit.

    There was a rather funny occasion when I was walking her in woods near an army barracks. Madam went dashing off, after something I’d not seen, and I heard a scream. She had caught a rabbit, and had her paws on its back and was washing its face! There was very high chain link fencing surrounding the barracks and clearly the rabbits had some burrow entrances under it, but this rabbit hadn’t been quick enough to find one. Madam let it go, and it sat up, looked round and then shot off a few yards and down a burrow.

    Due to changes in my circumstances, I had no rabbits for a few years. When I did get back into showing, I took another breed, New Zealand Reds, who are almost the same colour as a ruby Cavalier. Serena, Madam’s granddaughter, loved the rabbits and washed them, given half a chance. Sometimes I would put all the non-show does in a big pen on the lawn (sunlight fades their coats so the show bunnies stayed in shade!) and let the bucks run free in the garden. I wish I’d had a camera handy because one of the boys, frustrated that he could not get into the pen, found Serena lying on the grass with her nose to the pen wire and climbed on her back and humped her! Madam ignored these rabbits, her daughter Tipsy, Serena’s mother, likewise.

    I thought all the Cavaliers would all be OK, until Serena’s daughter Maria came along. She would have killed them all! The hunting instinct was well and truly to the fore. She would have killed our poultry, too, but we cured her of trying to get into their runs by putting her in a pen with a Barnvelder cockerel. They are a feisty breed and every time Maria tried to get near him he leapt up and thrust his spurs at her. He didn’t touch her, but after five minutes she had had enough and she never chased another hen.

    One of Tipsy’s ancestors, great great great great grandmother Chandlers Maria, was such a hunter that she would escape from her owners garden and be gone for three days at a time! She wasn’t in Madam’s pedigree. She was, however, in Maria’s father’s pedigree several times, so the hunting genes obviously got passed down both sides of the family.

    Conclusion, some Cavaliers are fine with “prey” animals and others are not.

    Jane

  4. #4

    Default

    This is SUCH a difficult question! I used to breed and show rabbits and when I bought my first Cavalier she was about ten to twelve weeks old. She was smaller than some of the rabbits, Alaskans, and bigger than others, Netherland Dwarfs. She was fine with them, except for one Netherland Dwarf doe who got very aggressive when she was pregnant and actually attacked Madam out on the lawn! Madam was ever after a little wary of this particular rabbit.

    There was a rather funny occasion when I was walking her in woods near an army barracks. Madam went dashing off, after something I’d not seen, and I heard a scream. She had caught a rabbit, and had her paws on its back and was washing its face! There was very high chain link fencing surrounding the barracks and clearly the rabbits had some burrow entrances under it, but this rabbit hadn’t been quick enough to find one. Madam let it go, and it sat up, looked round and then shot off a few yards and down a burrow.

    Due to changes in my circumstances, I had no rabbits for a few years. When I did get back into showing, I took another breed, New Zealand Reds, who are almost the same colour as a ruby Cavalier. Serena, Madam’s granddaughter, loved the rabbits and washed them, given half a chance. Sometimes I would put all the non-show does in a big pen on the lawn (sunlight fades their coats so the show bunnies stayed in shade!) and let the bucks run free in the garden. I wish I’d had a camera handy because one of the boys, frustrated that he could not get into the pen, found Serena lying on the grass with her nose to the pen wire and climbed on her back and humped her! Madam ignored these rabbits, her daughter Tipsy, Serena’s mother, likewise.

    I thought all the Cavaliers would all be OK, until Serena’s daughter Maria came along. She would have killed them all! The hunting instinct was well and truly to the fore. She would have killed our poultry, too, but we cured her of trying to get into their runs by putting her in a pen with a Barnvelder cockerel. They are a feisty breed and every time Maria tried to get near him he leapt up and thrust his spurs at her. He didn’t touch her, but after five minutes she had had enough and she never chased another hen.

    One of Tipsy’s ancestors, great great great great grandmother Chandlers Maria, was such a hunter that she would escape from her owners garden and be gone for three days at a time! She wasn’t in Madam’s pedigree. She was, however, in Maria’s father’s pedigree several times, so the hunting genes obviously got passed down both sides of the family.

    I have only this moment realised that I had given my Maria the same pet name as her ancestor!!! Her registered name was Jasenil Intermezzo.

    Conclusion, some Cavaliers are fine with “prey” animals and others are not.

    Jane

  5. #5

    Default

    We had no problems introducing our puppy to the rabbits, always under close supervision obviously!
    image.jpgimage.jpg

  6. #6

    Smile

    As said above, under supervision until they realise that it's part of the family. There are numerous videos of cavaliers living and playing with cats, birds and all sorts of things

    I looked after the neighbours rabbit, Fudge, a few times.

    This is when a young hyper Lexie first met fudge. I have a few more on my You Tube channel of Fudge trying to escape to freedom whilst Lexie and Alf sniff around

    Click this line to see Alfie's Picasa web photo albums

    Click this line to see Alfie's You Tube videos
    .
    Mark, and my Blen - Lexie DOB 7/07/11, and my B/T - Katie DOB 01/12/12

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